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D&T: Graphics, Resistant Materials, Food Technology

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Design and Technology KS3

In Key Stage 3 your son or daughter can expect to study 1 hour a week each in two Design and Technology areas i.e. 1 hour in Food and Textiles Technology and 1 hour in Technology (Product Design).
The general programmes followed are shown here:

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Design and Technology GCSE

The options information for KS4 is as follows:

This suite of syllabuses produces opportunities for you to develop an awareness of the nature and importance of design and technology in a rapidly changing society. It enables you to develop your application of knowledge and skills and your understanding of a particular technology focus within an overall DESIGN AND MAKE approach.

What can I do with Design and Technology Subjects?

There is a preconception that these courses are for people who are ‘good with their hands’. Whilst being able to make things is important, being willing to think, write and draw about how things are designed and made is more important.

The workplace will often require employees to be able to identify opportunities in the market, direct their ideas with informed specifications, develop and manufacture quality outcomes and be objective about the appropriateness of their work. The more senior professions will require knowledge and capability at all stages of the design process, while most occupations will require expertise in one or two areas only.

The courses go well with art, maths, physics, chemistry. The design work can be used to develop a portfolio of work for art and design based courses.

Irrespective of our chosen career, we are all consumers having to discriminate between products on a daily basis. It is impossible for us to be fully informed about every aspect of every product. This subject will, however, help you to make the right choices by encouraging you to ask the right questions. You will have a greater knowledge and understanding of those products that include technologies that reflect your chosen topic area.

Graphic Products GCSE

This is a course for people who enjoy designing things. You will learn drawing and presentation techniques in order to produce designs that solve real problems. You will manufacture models from paper, card, thin plastics, foams and some light wood (modelling materials) to make models of design solutions. You need to have a creative mind with a flexible approach to solving problems.

The course will be project based; you can expect to produce 2 to 3 mini projects before undertaking your controlled assessment. These will teach you about designing, presentation and drawing techniques, how to work with materials and tools, the theory necessary to do this and how you will be assessed.  As at Key Stage 3, we will ask for a contribution for the materials and equipment used.

You will be expected to complete CAD based drawings and apply CAM skills where necessary. We will make a CAM program available to you.

You’ll take one examination (Unit 1) which will test all the theory work you do. Questions will be about design, so you will be expected to draw lots of answers, you will need to work quickly and accurately and use colour/shade effectively as well as having a good imagination for 3D shapes. There will also be questions about how things are designed and made and the processes used to make things.

At the end of Year 10 and for most of Year 11 you will be working on Unit 2. This will involve you in producing a design folder and something you have made to solve a problem set by the examination board. Be warned – it’ll feel like you’ve got weeks to design and make this, but 45 hours isn’t very much. If you don’t like doing homework you will struggle to do your best.

Useful things to have are a space to draw and design and the equipment (coloured pencils, pens, rulers) to do it with, a PC to carry out CAD work and some space to finish off practical work. You will also need to support your studies with the purchase of additional modelling materials where necessary. You’ll be well supplied with shops in Chelmsford to help you.

What Can I do with the Qualification?

The examination leads to ‘A’ level Product Design in the 6th Form at Great Baddow High School with consequential courses in Advertising, Architecture, Design, Engineering (structural, automotive, computer) and Architectural Construction. These courses could also be picked up at further education colleges. The qualification is also useful to employers running modern apprenticeships and craft based industries. Lastly, it is a useful course for those wishing to broaden academic options, but wanting to maintain a balance of self-expression.

This course goes well with art. The design work can be used to develop a portfolio of work for art and design based courses.

Assessment

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Resistant Materials GCSE

This is a course for students who enjoy making things, BUT they have to be prepared to design them as well. You will work in plastic, wood and metal and be expected to be able to mix these materials in your design to come up with the best solution to a problem. What you design and make has to work!

The course will be project based; you can expect to produce 2 to 3 mini projects before undertaking your controlled assessment. These will teach you about designing, how to work with materials and tools, the theory necessary to do this and how you will be assessed.  We will ask for a contribution for the materials used. You will be expected to complete CAD based drawings and apply CAM skills where necessary. We will make a CAM program available to you.

You’ll take one examination (Unit 1) which will test all the theory work you do. Questions will be about design, so you will be expected to draw some answers. There will also be questions about how things are made and the processes used to make things.

At the end of Year 10 and for most of Year 11 you will be working on Unit 2. This will involve you in producing a design folder and something you have made to solve a problem set by the examination board. Be warned – it’ll feel like you’ve got weeks to design and make this, but 45 hours isn’t very much. If you don’t like doing homework you will struggle to do your best.

Useful things to have are a space to draw and design and the equipment (coloured pencils, pens, rulers) to do it with, a PC to carry out CAD work and some space to finish off practical work. You will also need to support your studies with the purchase of additional materials where necessary.

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What Can I do with the Qualification?

The examination leads to ‘A’ level Product Design in the 6th Form at Great Baddow High School with consequential courses in Engineering (electrical, mechanical, production, structural, automotive, computer), Architectural Construction and Product Design. These courses could also be picked up at further education colleges. The qualification is also useful to employers running modern apprenticeships in engineering, building and service trades. Lastly, it is a useful course for those wishing to broaden academic options, but wanting to maintain a balance of practical skills for use.

 

 

Assessment

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Engineering GCSE

Course Description

Intended as an introduction to Engineering, this qualification allows students to develop skills and understanding which will be of use generally and as part of a progressive career path leading to further technical or academic engineering qualifications. A major change this year is that we are offering the subject as a GCSE. It follows seamlessly into A level Product design and provides a sound basis for Post 16 studies. The course integrates designing, making and the applications of technologies which are delivered as manageable tasks.

This course is for those students who would like to work in engineering and associated industries. A reminder: Engineering is not oily rags and steam trains anymore, although they made important contributions to its development! This course is intended to equip students for a place in a high tech future, competing in global markets. You will work primarily with metals, plastics and some smart/modern materials.

The course contains significant amounts of mathematics and applied science.

The course focuses on real world engineered products. The design involved is problem solving rather than creative. Drawn solutions are produced using engineering conventions. Year 10 is spent preparing for this, learning mechanical, pneumatic and electronic symbols and components, how they are made and how they inter-relate. There will be series of mini projects focussing on the theory alongside some standalone theory work. This will form the knowledge base for the examination.

The latter part of Year 10 and Year 11 will be spent on Unit 2 Controlled Assessment. The difference between the product made here and other similar GCSEs is that the product can only be from one of the three areas (Mechanical, Pneumatic and Electronic products). This requires a high degree of applied mathematical and scientific understanding in order to demonstrate a design’s efficacy.

Useful things to have are:

  • A PC or (access to one) to carry out CAD work and write Controlled Assessment work.
  • Some space to finish off practical work.
  • The drive to do some industrial research.
  • Links with engineering through family or friends.

What can I do with the Qualification?

The course can lead to ‘A’ level Product Design in the 6th Form at Great Baddow High School. Externally it can lead to courses in Engineering (electrical, mechanical, production, structural, automotive, computer), structural engineering and construction. The qualification is of particular interest to employers running modern apprenticeships in engineering, building and service trades. The course is designed to make employable individuals; when a local industrialist was questioned he stated that he would employ students with English, Maths and Science but would give preferential treatment to those who came to him with prior Engineering experience through a qualification such as this. Therefore, this course is particularly important for those who intend to go into industry at 16.

This course goes well with maths, physics and chemistry.

Assessment

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GCE DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY  

Design and Technology: Product Design

This course is designed to build on the experience of GCSE and allow you to further your study of Product Design. Don’t worry if your GCSE course wasn’t called that! The GCSEs that will allow easy access to the course are: Resistant Materials Graphic Products Textiles Electronic Products The course is based on the study of ‘real world’ manufacturing with the exception that you get to study, design and make products in school.

What the course goes well with and where it could lead

If you’re good at art, maths, and science it compliments your skills. Universities will look at your course for engineering disciplines as long as it is accompanied by maths and physics. In the same way architects will need art and this subject and a supporting maths or science base. It is an excellent course for building portfolios of design work for art, design and fashion courses for further and higher education. If you intend to take up a modern apprenticeship at 18+ it will provide an increased awareness of industry whilst developing practically applied skills.

What you need

If you’ve studied GCSE level you should have an understanding of the time necessary to commit to successful study of the subject. You’ll need access to computers and drawing equipment and you’ll need to know how to structure your study time to make best use of it. Access to tools and equipment isn’t essential but it is useful. Lastly, you must have a positive attitude to designing and making, take a pride in completing both the written and drawn sections of work and the practical work to the best of your ability.

Assessment

The course will be assessed on the following units:

AS Level

Unit title

Description

Advanced Innovation Challenge

The advanced innovation challenge requires candidates to design and   model in a design workshop or examination room and complete a workbook and   question paper.

Product Study

The product study consists of product analysis and product   development, prototype modelling and testing.

A2 Level

Unit title

Description

Design, Make and Evaluate

Candidates are required to produce a coursework portfolio and product   which fully demonstrates their designing, making and evaluation skills, using   creativity, flair and innovation.

Product Design

The subject content of this unit is focused towards products and   applications and their analysis in respect of:-

Materials, components and their uses

Manufacturing processes

Industrial and commercial practices

 

Food Technology & Catering

 

 

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Our aim is to encourage pupils to achieve their very best irrespective of their starting point. We hope that pupils will develop a long lasting enjoyment of cooking which will help them to look after themselves and others throughout their lives. We create opportunities for pupils to make a wide range of different dishes in a safe and stimulating environment.

In line with the National Curriculum Programmes of study for Cooking and Nutrition pupils cook a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet.

We have a team of three experienced teachers and a Technician who are able to offer a wealth of expertise within the area of Food Technology and Catering. We have three specialist Food Technology rooms. Each room is well resourced with all the essential equipment for food preparation. Food safety and hygiene is of paramount importance to us and pupils are encouraged to adopt a team approach to working in a practical situation much the same as would be in the food industry or a Hospitality & Catering establishment.

The nature of our subject ensures that lessons are always active and enjoyable with pupils often rapidly learning a new skill or technique.

The course we run:

Food Technology is taught to all key stage 3 pupils.

 

In Year 7 pupils learn about where food comes from, how to cook a range of dishes safely and hygienically and to apply their knowledge of healthy eating.  They will make a variety of dishes such as a fruit salad, fairy cakes, ragu sauce and breakfast muffins.


In Year 8 pupils to learn how to cook a range of dishes safely and hygienically and to apply their knowledge of nutrition. In addition, they will consider the factors that affect food choice, food availability and food waste. Dishes made will include savoury rice, mini carrot cakes, pizza wheels, frittata and turkey burgers.


In Year 9 pupils to learn how to cook a range of dishes safely and hygienically and apply their knowledge of nutrition. In addition, they will consider consumer issues, food and its functions and new technologies/trends in food. Dishes made will include vegetable risotto, penne florentine, spring rolls/samosas, thai green curry and fajitas and cheese straws.

 

  Year 7 Year 8 Year 9
TERM 1 Health & Safety week Health & Safety week Health & Safety week
Food Technology Food Technology Food Technology
Food & Cooking 1 Diet & Health 1 Making Choices 1
FPT FPT FPT
TERM 2a Health & Safety    
Textiles Technology Diet & Health 2 Food Technology
Mouse Challenge   Making Choices 2
FPT FPT FPT
TERM 2b Design Technology    
     
TERM 3 Design Technology Health & Safety 2 Food Technology
    Textiles Technology Festival Foods
    Design & Make FPT
    Decorative cushion  

 

Textiles Technology is taught to year 7 and 8 pupils.

In Year 7 pupils learn about the safe use of a variety of textiles tools including the sewing machine.  They learn hand sewing techniques to make a felt bookmark and a mouse.


In Year 8 pupils look at the work of other designers and design and make a cushion.  Pupils use product analysis to understand how design impacts on individuals, society and the environment. They develop techniques learning about the application of colour, applique and machine and hand embroidery. They evaluate their own work and the work of their peers to help broaden their understanding of consumer needs.


At key stage 4 we offer GCSE Catering plus GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition from 2016/17.
Pupils study the following topics for 6 hours a fortnight during year 10 and 11.

Items of interest:

At Key stage 3 pupils will usually follow a fortnightly routine where one lesson is a teacher led demonstration accompanied by written work to help embed their learning and the second lesson is an opportunity for pupils to make the product for themselves. Homework will be set to reinforce pupils learning or it may take the form of preparation for the practical lesson.


In our experience pupils really enjoy sharing the dishes that they have made with their families and friends and so homework may sometimes take the form of an evaluation activity.


The recipes for Key stage 3 pupils are carefully selected so a wider range of skills are developed and so that progression can be made from Year 7 to Year 9. Pupils will always be given advance warning of what ingredients they will need to bring to the lesson. We are mindful that ingredients can be expensive and remind pupils that they should make wise choices when asking for ingredients from home. We encourage pupils to make smaller amounts wherever possible and to take care to not waste food.


At Key Stage 4 pupils opting for GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition, spend approximately 60% of their lesson time involved in practical activities. Pupils work to perfect their existing skill and develop the ability to make more advanced and complex dishes. Pupils are expected to demonstrate a wider range of skills along with an excellent understanding of and the practical implementation of the principles of food safety, and health and safety. Dishes such as Normandy Apple Flan, Chelsea Buns, Fish Pie, Shepherd’s Pie, Lasagne, Bakewell Tart, Meringues, Béchamel Sauce, and Profiteroles may be made by our students. 


We run a Cookery Club afterschool which is open to Year 7 & 8 pupils.

Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural education through design and food technology

Pupils have an understanding of each other’s needs.


Pupils know that it is a positive gesture to share resources and ingredients and frequently show generosity to others by sharing ingredients that they have brought from home and offer peer support to pupils who find a particular activity challenging.  Pupils demonstrate a clear understanding of safe working and are conscious of the potential hazards and their responsibility to themselves and others.


Design and Technology lessons make a particular contribution to children’s Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural development through: 

  • Reflecting on products and inventions, the diversity of materials and ways in which design can improve the quality of our lives;
  • Awareness of the moral dilemmas created by technological advances;
  • How different cultures have contributed to technology;
  • Opportunities to work as a team, recognising others’ strengths, sharing equipment.

In Food Technology pupils are encourage to use a wide range of ingredients looking at the dietary needs of themselves and others. They understand the importance of designing to meet a special dietary need such as vegetarianism and the moral and ethical reason why individuals choose this lifestyle.


At KS 3 pupils are encouraged to explore ways to modify basic recipes such as pizza, pasta bake or curry to accommodate the special need. Pupils look at factors which have influenced the flavours of British cuisine and the wealth of multicultural influences that exist in our communities today. Pupils design and make dishes with a typically Italian theme using the flavours commonly associated with Mediterranean foods. Pupils identify and use spices to create popular healthy main course dishes.  

Pupils are encouraged to understand the origins of food and that many of the ingredients they will use during lessons are imported or may travel long distances to supermarkets. We encourage pupils to purchase locally produced foods. We appreciate that it is important for pupils to recognise the terms: transport costs, sustainability, religious and cultural preferences, Genetically Modified (GM) foods, organic and free range foods, Fair-trade, farm assured.


Pupils in both Key Stages are given opportunities to celebrate special occasions throughout the year.

 

WJEC Catering

Assessment Weighting

Unit 1: Catering skills related to food preparation and service

Controlled   Task 120 marks (120 UMS)

Two practical   tasks selected from a bank of six WJEC set tasks.

Internally   assessed using WJEC set criteria and externally moderated.

45 hours in   total.

60%

Unit 2: Catering, food and the customer

Written paper 1   1/4 hours 80 marks (80 UMS)

One paper which   will be externally set and marked.

All questions compulsory   and targeted at the full range of GCSE grades.

The paper will   contain short-answer, structured and free response questions

drawn from the   catering content.

This examination   will be available either as an electronic assessment or as a traditional   written paper.

 

AQA Food Preparation and Nutrition from 2016

This new GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition is an exciting and creative course which focuses on practical cooking skills to ensure students develop a thorough understanding of nutrition, food provenance and the working characteristics of food materials. At its heart, this qualification focuses on nurturing students' practical cookery skills to give them a strong understanding of nutrition.

Food preparation skills are integrated into five core topics:

1. Food, nutrition and health

2. Food science

3. Food safety

4. Food choice

5. Food provenance.

NCFE Level 1 & 2 Certificates in Food and Cooking

Upon completion of this course, students will be qualified to go on to further study, or embark on an apprenticeship or full time career in the catering or food industries.

The NCFE Level 1 and Level 21 Certificates in Food and Cookery are complementary Technical Awards and the vocational equivalent of GCSE qualifications. Both are aimed learners who are interested in any aspect of food and cookery and in the context of cooking for health. Each qualification focuses on an applied study of the food and cookery sector and learners will gain a broad understanding and knowledge of working in the sector. The qualifications have been designed to sit alongside the requirements of core GCSE subjects and are appropriate for learners who are motivated and challenged by learning through hands-on experiences and through content which is concrete and related directly to those experiences. This Level 2 qualification is appropriate for learners who are looking to develop a significant core of knowledge and understanding and apply that knowledge in preparing and producing dishes. Level 1 is appropriate for students looking for an introduction to the skills, knowledge and qualities needed in the food and cookery occupational area.

What will the learner study as part of this qualification? This qualification shows learners how: • to prepare self and environment for cooking • food functions in the body and in recipes • to modify recipes for health for balanced diets • to assess a diet and make recommendations • to plan and produce dishes for a purpose.

 

 


  

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